Sunday, December 21, 2014

The Ultimate Guide to Black Holes

A black hole is a region of spacetime from which gravity prevents anything, including light, from escaping.[1] The theory of general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass will deform spacetime to form a black hole. Around a black hole, there is a mathematically defined surface called an event horizon that marks the point of no return. The hole is called "black" because it absorbs all the light that hits the horizon, reflecting nothing, just like a perfect black body in thermodynamics.[2][3] Quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit radiation like a black body with a finite temperature. This temperature is inversely proportional to the mass of the black hole, making it difficult to observe this radiation for black holes of stellar mass or greater.



Objects whose gravity fields are too strong for light to escape were first considered in the 18th century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace. The first modern solution of general relativity that would characterize a black hole was found by Karl Schwarzschild in 1916, although its interpretation as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by David Finkelstein in 1958. Long considered a mathematical curiosity, it was during the 1960s that theoretical work showed black holes were a generic prediction of general relativity. The discovery of neutron stars sparked interest in gravitationally collapsed compact objects as a possible astrophysical reality.

Black holes of stellar mass are expected to form when very massive stars collapse at the end of their life cycle. After a black hole has formed it can continue to grow by absorbing mass from its surroundings. By absorbing other stars and merging with other black holes, supermassive black holes of millions of solar masses may form. There is general consensus that supermassive black holes exist in the centers of most galaxies.

Despite its invisible interior, the presence of a black hole can be inferred through its interaction with other matter and with electromagnetic radiation such as light. Matter falling onto a black hole can form an accretion disk heated by friction, forming some of the brightest objects in the universe. If there are other stars orbiting a black hole, their orbit can be used to determine its mass and location. These data can be used to exclude possible alternatives (such as neutron stars). In this way, astronomers have identified numerous stellar black hole candidates in binary systems, and established that the core of our Milky Way galaxy contains a supermassive black hole of about 4.3 million solar masses.

The Law Of Attraction: Does It Really Work?

Is "the secret" something to live by? Can the law of attraction really bring you what you want, simply by visualizing it? What you think about you bring about!



Video by Jaclyn Glenn, 2014

Scientific minds Richard Dawkins



Video by BBV Four

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Praying for Atheists!



Video by Jaclyn Glenn, December 2014

Black Holes - Wonders of the Universe: Falling

Using Zambia's spectacular Victoria Falls, Prof Brian Cox demonstrates what happens as you near a black hole.

The Interview with Seth Rogen - Bill Maher interview (HBO)

Bill Maher and Seth Rogen discuss North Korea and the joys of marijuana in this clip from November 21, 2014. Rogen is the co-writer, co-director and star of “The Interview,”.



Real Time with Bill Maher: The Interview with Seth Rogen (HBO)

--

The Interview Official Final Trailer

Friday, December 19, 2014

Video Captures EXACTLY How Cops Treat Black People

"A cell phone video posted to YouTube this week shows a St. Paul police officer roughing up a black man who was apparently doing nothing more than sitting in the skyway, waiting to pick up his kids.

At 9:43 a.m. on January 31, police were summoned to the skyway in downtown St. Paul's First National Bank Building on a report of a man loitering. The video footage shows an officer asking the then-27-year-old man to provide his name.

"Why do I have to let you know who I am? Who I am isn't the problem," the man calmly replies.”



* The Young Turks hosts John Iadarola (TYT University) and Michael Shure break it down.

--

St. Paul police roughly arrest black man sitting in skyway [VIDEO]

This is what happens when you call the cops

#AskACop



Call the Cops - Rob Hustle ft. Bump
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...